TREATMENTS2018-08-14T03:53:34+00:00

 

TREATMENTS

Stem Cell Therapy for ALS

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, is characterized by a progressive loss (reduction) of certain nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord called motor neurons.

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Stem Cell Therapy for Autism

Autism is a disorder characterized by the impairment of social interactions, communication, anxiety, mood swings, repetitive behaviours, as well as metabolic and digestive issues.

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Stem Cell Therapy for Brain Injury

Thanks to stem cell therapy, recovery from brain injury is now possible. The stem cell transplant is able to gradually restore the brain functions that have been lost after the injury.

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Stem Cell Therapy for Cerebral Palsy

Cerebral palsy is a disorder that affects different types of movements and postures. This happens due to an injury (non-progressive) or a defect in the patient’s immature brain.

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Stem Cell Therapy for Diabetes

Diabetes is characterized by a group of metabolic diseases that cause high blood sugar, either because the diagnosed patient’s body isn’t producing enough insulin.

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Stem Cell Therapy for Kidney Failure

If a patient’s kidneys fail to filter the waste products from the blood, they will most likely be diagnosed with Kidney Failure (Renal Insufficiency).

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Stem Cell Therapy for Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis refers to the main disabling condition of young adults. It is a demyelinating disease with the possibility of extending to the entire nervous system.

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Stem Cell Therapy for Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid Arthritis is an autoimmune condition that mostly affects joints but it also affects other organs in over 15-25% of patients.

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Stem Cell Implantation for Spinal Cord Injury

There are thousands of patients who suffer from spinal cord injuries (SCI) every year. The reasons are numerous: accidental falls, traffic accidents, and other unexpected events.

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